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Best Things To Do In Zurich Switzerland

things to do in zurich

The capital of Switzerland is located on the shores of its dazzling eponymous lake. Zürich is a financial powerhouse with a liveability rating that surpasses nearly every other city on the planet. You may board trains from the Hauptbahnhof and be on top of the world in minutes, breathing in fresh air, and the city’s rivers and that lovely lake provide excellent swimming water. These outdoor pools, known as “badis,” have turned into nightclubs in the city’s heart.

The Altstadt, a historic center split in two by the Limmat river that runs off the lake, houses Zürich’s landmarks, exorbitantly priced stores, and effortlessly hip nightlife. Let’s Check Things To Do In Zurich Switzerland.

1: Lake Zurich

This long, crescent-shaped lake curves past the Pfannenstiel chain to the east and the Albis chain to the west, past the wooded peaks of Pfannenstiel. There are numerous ways to make the most of the lake, some of which we will discuss in further detail later.

If you’re merely strolling around the city, though, the gorgeous promenade along the east coast in the Seefeld area is a good option. In the summer, you may look across the lake to Uetliberg and see hundreds of yachts and other craft gliding across the water.

The promenade runs from Bellevue to Tiefenbrunnen and is three kilometers long. In the 1880s, a network of pathways was laid out along the lakeside.

2: Museum of Art

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Zürich’s magnificent Museum of Art is located beside the Schauspielhaus on Heimplatz. In a collection that stands out for having the world’s largest single cache of works by Swiss 20th-century artist Alberto Giacometti, there are works dating from the 1200s to the 2000s. View works by symbolists such as Ferdinand Hodler, Romantics such as Henry Fuseli, and modern artists such as Pipilotti Rist and Peter Fischli to pique your interest in Swiss art.

There’s also a lot of international art, including the world’s largest Edvard Munch collection outside of Scandinavia, as well as pieces by van Gogh, Monet, Marc Chagall, Picasso, and Max Beckmann, as well as works by Rembrandt and Domenichino.

3: Altstadt Old Town

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Zürich’s historic centre spans both banks of the Limmat and takes up the entirety of Kreis 1 (District 1).
Much of the city’s entertainment, nightlife, and shopping is focused on the Altstadt’s mediaeval and early modern streets. It’s one of those locations where you’re glad to get lost in, discovering squares, cafes, eccentric one-of-a-kind stores, and a plethora of ancient structures ranging from four mediaeval churches to the 17th-century Town Hall.
The Limmat waterfront is worth seeing, and on the right side of the Limmatquai are lovely mediaeval guild houses for craftsmen, merchants, spice traders, and other trade associations.
The immense magnitude of the defensive works that took place during the 17th century, when ramparts and the Schanzengraben moat were created, can be felt on the west side of the Altstadt.

4: Grossmünster

This Romanesque church’s two towers may easily be Zürich’s most visible feature. The Grossmünster, which began as a monastic church in the early 12th century and was completed slightly over a century later, was originally a monastic church. The main gateway, with its sculpted capitals depicting grotesques, will appeal to anybody interested in mediaeval architecture.

The crypt, the church’s oldest section, is also original, with faded murals by Hans Leu the Elder dating from the 1400s. Grossmünster was the epicentre of the Swiss Reformation in the 16th century, which was led by Huldrych Zwingli and resulted in the church’s separation from the papal in 1523. At the church, there is a museum dedicated to these events.

The stained glass windows are modern, including one set by German modern artist Sigmar Polke and another set by Alberto Giacometti in the choir.

5: Lindenhof

A peak previously crowned by a Roman castle looms over the Limmat’s left bank in the city’s heart. This elevated vantage point, covered by lime trees, provides an unobstructed view of Zürich’s oldest sections on the right bank, allowing you to pick out skyline monuments such as City Hall, the Grossmünster Church, the university, and the Limmat’s coastline.

The Lindenhof is a peaceful spot presently, but it has a colorful past: Charlemagne’s grandson Louis the German erected his palace here in the 9th century, long after the Roman fort was decommissioned. In 1798, the inhabitants of Zürich swore the oath to the Helvetic Constitution at this precise location.

6: Swiss National Museum

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This museum, which highlights Swiss culture and takes you on a journey through the country’s past, has Switzerland’s largest collection of historical items. You’ll start with prehistoric weapons and ceramics and work your way up to the twentieth century.

Certain eras, such as the medieval period with its great Gothic art, are particularly well represented. The enormous collection of wooden pictures, carved altars, and triptychs from chapels and churches across the country dates back to the Renaissance. In the gallery, you may also see Swiss art movements and examine the treasures of Zürich’s historic armory. Everything is contained in a lavish Renaissance Revival mansion built in 1898.

7: Uetliberg

It has been feasible to take the train from the city centre to the summit of this mountain to the southwest since 1875. You’ll be near the top in 25 minutes if you take the S10 on the SZU from Hauptbahnhof.
The summit is only a short distance from the Uetlibertg station.

Up there, the vista is breathtaking, with views of Zürich, its rivers, the lake, and the snow-capped Alps in the distance. At the crest, there’s a restaurant and a hotel, but most day-trippers come to trek in the woods.

The peak lies above the veil of fog that cloaks the city, penetrated only by the tallest buildings, during the start of winter. You can climb back down the slope to the city if you’re still in good shape, but there’s also a cable car that runs between Felsenegg and Adliswil.

8: Niederdorf

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The new and vibrant Niederdorf neighbourhood lies beneath the towers of the Grossmünster. Locals in Zürich refer to it as Dörfli, and you’ll understand why after you’ve experienced the mood in this tangle of car-free cobblestone streets on the Limmat’s right bank. It’s a great place to browse design shops and stylish boutiques during the day, and it’s a great place to paint the town red at night.

In terms of cuisine, you must try the zürcher geschnetzeltes, which is veal in a wine and cream sauce. Some sites, such as the Conditorei Péclard, a historic cafe with century-old decor, and Cabaret Voltaire, one of the birthplaces of the Dada movement, deserve special attention.

9: Limmat Cruise

Go to the dock in front of the Landesmuseum for a cruise down the city’s main river (Swiss National Museum). From April to October, cruises are available, with boats departing every half hour.
In addition, throughout the months of July and August, you can travel at any time between 09:05 and 21:05. It’s a worthwhile excursion because you’ll get a lovely view of Zürich’s Old Town, which stretches over both banks of the river.
The boats are planned to sail beneath all seven of the city’s Limmat bridges, providing a unique perspective on landmarks such as Grossmünster and Fraumünster.

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