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8 Best Things to Do in Hobart, Australia

Best Things to Do in Hobart

Hobart, the capital and largest city of the Australian island state of Tasmania, is a delight to visit. It stands in a picturesque place on the banks of the River Derwent, at the foot of enormous Mount Wellington, and serves as a gateway to the tremendous richness and environment of the island’s south.

It was formed as a British penal colony in 1804 and is Australia’s second-oldest city. Hobart still has centuries-old colonial buildings with interesting historic tourist attractions, stunning architecture, and wonderful museums thanks to its distant position.

Many of Hobart’s most enjoyable activities may be found around the city’s bustling waterfront. The harborfront is lined with superb seafood restaurants and atmospheric cafes, as well as marinas and markets. With so much to offer and so many incredible outdoor activities close by, it’s no surprise that Hobart is becoming a more popular tourist destination for both Australians and international visitors.

1: Mount Wellington

Mount Wellington, which dominates the city’s skyline and can be seen from anywhere in town, dominates the city’s skyline. You can drive to the top of its rising summit, which offers stunning vistas and a variety of outdoor activities, in just twenty minutes.

It reaches 1,271 metres and is often covered in snow, even in the summer. It is also known as “kunanyi” in the local Aboriginal language. While the mountain’s top reaches are sparsely forested and rugged, the lower slopes are covered with lush woods and flower-filled meadows, with wonderful hiking and mountain biking trails winding through the countryside.

On clear days, the Pacific Ocean can be seen off in the distance from its tall top, which offers panoramic views of the city and its environs. Also read Best Things to Do in Las Vegas.

2: Museum of New and Old Art

Source: afar.com

When in town, the completely unusual and engaging Museum of New and Old Art is a must-see. Its thought-provoking, and downright disturbing, artworks cover everything from sex and death to sarcophagi, space, and sound installations, and have been dubbed a “subversive adult Disneyland.”

Its aesthetically remarkable edifice, which was opened to the public in 2011, is located on the banks of the River Derwent, fifteen minutes north of the city centre. Three more floors have been excavated into the ground, despite the fact that it looks to just have one floor. It has a purposely sinister aspect due to its absence of windows and labyrinth of tunnels and halls.

There are more than 1,900 works of art to see, ranging from the extraordinary to the absurd. Ancient artefacts and stunning Egyptian mummies are displayed alongside contemporary works. If eccentric multimillionaire owner David Walsh’s interesting collection does not pique your interest, you can always go outside and admire the beautiful scenery that surrounds the museum.

3: Salamanca Market

Salamanca Market has long been regarded as one of Hobart’s most popular attractions. Every Saturday between the hours of 8.30 a.m. and 15.00 p.m., it features hundreds of stands and stalls selling everything under the sun.

The vast market, which opened in 1972 and now occupies all of Salamanca Place adjacent to Hobart’s waterfront, is a firm favorite with locals and tourists alike. From delectable artisan cheeses and freshly baked items to fresh fruits and veggies, as well as local handicrafts and jewellery, you’ll find it all here. Also read Best Things to Do in Curacao .

4: Royal Tasmanian Botanical Gardens

The Royal Tasmanian Botanical Gardens house an incredible collection of flowers and plants from all across Australia and beyond. Its beautiful grounds and gardens are located near to Tasman Bridge, just a short drive north of Hobart, and are part of Queen’s Domain park.

It was founded in 1818 and presently houses over 6,000 varieties of exotic and native plants, making it the country’s second-oldest botanical garden. Ponds, colourful flower beds, calm Chinese and Japanese gardens, prickly cacti collections, and a spectacular floral clock may all be found when roaming around its enormous landscape.

The Subantarctic Plant House, on the other hand, is an undisputed highlight, displaying the unusual flora of the Southern Ocean islands in a frigid, climate-controlled setting.

5: Battery Point

The charming marine village of Battery Point, with its meandering roads and beautiful homes, is just fifteen minutes’ walk from the city and is a true joy to explore. It is one of the city’s most historic neighborhoods, located to the south of the popular Salamanca Market.

It was called after the battery of guns that were placed on the point as part of Hobart’s coastal fortifications when it was founded in 1818. It was formerly a peaceful fishing village, but it is now one of the city’s wealthiest neighbourhoods. Cozy cafes, lovely cottages, and a plethora of antique shops and booksellers sit beside magnificent mansions and architectural jewels. Also read Best Things to Do in Rotterdam.

6: Mount Nelson

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Mount Nelson, at 352 metres, is located directly south of the city centre and offers some of the best views of both Hobart and the Derwent River. The lower mount is well worth visiting, despite the fact that its outlook is generally disregarded in favour of Mount Wellington. There are also exquisite nature locations and a colonial-era signal station to see.

You can be atop the mount in less than 10 minutes, staring out across both the city and the river, with the Tasman Bridge and Bruny Island visible from its summit. There is an evocative old signal station erected in 1811, as well as a café and picnic area.

The Truganini Conservation Area, located next to the overlook, features gorgeous bushland to explore as well as a touching tribute to Tasmanian Aboriginal people and their descendants.

7: Cascade Brewery

The Cascade Brewery, just five minutes’ drive southwest of the centre on the outskirts of town, provides an interesting look into another aspect of Australia and Hobart’s past. Offering Mount Wellington rising impressively in the backdrop, it is set in a gorgeous yet isolated location with tours and tastings for guests to enjoy.

It was founded in 1824 and continues to produce award-winning ales, stouts, and bitters today, making it the country’s oldest continually functioning brewery. On tours of the lovely property, you’ll learn about the brewing and bottling processes, as well as the brewery’s fascinating history. Then try some of the brewery’s hallmark beers, like Cascade Pale Ale and Cascade Premium Light.
The brewery’s grand Gothic structure, which looks out over its beautiful gardens, is just as remarkable as the sparkling beers themselves. There is also a restaurant and a bar on the site. Also read Best Things to Do in Solvang.

8: Mawson’s Hut Replica Museum

Source: discovertasmania.com.au

The Mawson’s Hut Replica Museum is another intriguing attraction in the waterfront region. Its immersive installation transports you back in time to the very cold and hostile surroundings of Commonwealth Bay in Antarctica, making it a fascinating destination to visit.

The little but wonderful museum, which opened in 2013, chronicles Douglas Mawson’s Australasian Antarctic Expedition of 1911-14. You can examine artifacts and equipment they utilised, as well as models of the shelters they hunkered down in. Exhibits inform you about their significant accomplishments as well as the numerous hurdles they faced.

Aside from viewing ice axes and sledges, you’ll hear about the expedition’s explorers’ daily lives. The earnings from the museum go entirely to the upkeep of the original huts in Antarctica.

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